The Forest film review.

Posted: February 1, 2016 in Movies
Tags: , , , , ,

The Forest stars Natalie Dormer playing a pair of American twin sisters. One sister, Jess, teaches English in Japan. The other sister Sara, the main character of the story, receives news that Jess is missing and presumed dead. This story follows the conceit that twins can sense each others troubles, so Sara, presuming Jess is still alive, goes to Japan to look for her.

Most of the story take place in the real life Aokigahara Forest near Mount Fuji. Jess was seen wandering off into that forest, which is widely known in Japan as a place people go to commit suicide. Given that, there’s a few false scares as various bodies are seen hanging from trees or floating in rivers that were apparent deaths by suicide.

Along the way we get a few flashbacks of the sisters’ relationship. There’s a common pattern in their past of Sara getting Jess out of trouble. A family secret is dredged up that bring an angle of how Jess looks directly into the darkness in life, and Sara usually turns away from it.

Meanwhile a tour guide to the forest warns Sara that she will see things in the woods that aren’t really there. This leads to events the audience will wonder if they are supernatural in nature or only in Sarah’s mind. This races us to a conclusion that is not quite expected.

The Forest offers plenty of false scares and decently tense moments. Along the way it brings some glimpses of Japanese culture as well as life as in English teacher in Asia. The Forest is a different kind of horror story that I would recommend.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s